December 26, 2011

Our photographers hit the ground running this year.
By March, the tragic events in Japan and the fastbreaking
developments of the Arab Spring left us
nearly breathless. But there’s no timeout in the
news business. Social issues like education, gay
marriage, immigration, as well as economic issues
– thrown into sharp focus by the “Occupy” movement
– gave us opportunities to meet a cross section of Americans. And still
the news goes on: We look forward to the challenge and opportunity the new
year will surely bring. For now, here are some of our images we like best from
2011, some seen here for the first time.  See more

– Alfredo Sosa, director of photography

7:48pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbBEfxDqE-XS
Filed under: news photography 
December 12, 2011

Mexico drug war casualty: Citizenry suffers post-traumatic stress.

Outwardly, life seems normal; but as drug war kidnappings, extortion, and violence brush closer to the average citizen, experts say, the mental terrain looks like post-traumatic stress.  Read this Christian Science Monitor story

September 20, 2011

The scale of the disaster that struck Japan six months ago is difficult to grasp: The 9.0 earthquake moved Japan eight feet closer to the United States and knocked the planet off its axis by four to six inches. The tidal wave generated struck 500 miles of coastline, reached heights of up to 130 feet, and penetrated up to six miles inland. The total bill for reconstruction – including the shutdown of the Fukushima nuclear power plant – is estimated at up to $300 billion. It’s an effort that has barely begun.
But of greatest concern to survivors in the region is that the nation’s attention is shifting away. “What the people want more than anything at all is the sense that other people – the rest of Japan – are keeping a careful watch over them and are ready to help,” says Yuka Kusano, leader of the Miyagi Jonet aid group for victims. “Instead, they fear that the rest of Japan … [has] forgotten about them.” 

Owen Thomas - Deputy editor, Monitor Weekly

(Source: csmoniitor.com)

September 15, 2011

We all have to eat. But what we eat, where and how we eat it, is consuming our attention at mealtime. There is a food renaissance in America and the Monitor’s Kendra Nordin explores the why of it all. There’s a visit to Oleanna’s Restaurant, a favorite of locavores. The choice between “blue” and “yellow” at the Night Market attracted a youthful crowd where food and art blended; an up and coming chef served his glamorous version of the humble clam fritter; and the faithful gathered at a weekly farmers’ market for their fresh produce.  Joanne Ciccarello/staff

September 1, 2011

For most children in the Northern Hemisphere, September means a new start at school. And while dress codes and classrooms vary, multiplication tables and youthful intensity do not. Here’s a selection of images taken by Monitor photographers of young students around the world.

Alfredo Sosa- Director of Photography & Multimedia

(Source: csmoniitor.com)

August 29, 2011

A free clinic funded by the Surmang Foundation, an American NGO, is located on the Tibetan Plateau, China. The foundation is the first foreign NGO to be registered in Quinghai Province.

Click on the photos above to see a larger version

Check out the full photo gallery on CSMonitor.com with more pictures from the clinic and surrounding area.

All photos by Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff

August 2, 2011
A child’s notebook lies near a burned out home in Eldoret, Kenya, which suffered widespread violence after 2007 elections.
Some staff photos and videos from the upcoming “My Africa ” by Monitor Africa bureau chief Scott Baldauf.  As I said in my prior post, this body of work reflects a long commitment to the continent and countless hours of work.
Alfredo Sosa- Director of Photography & Multimedia

A child’s notebook lies near a burned out home in Eldoret, Kenya, which suffered widespread violence after 2007 elections.

Some staff photos and videos from the upcoming “My Africa ” by Monitor Africa bureau chief Scott Baldauf.  As I said in my prior post, this body of work reflects a long commitment to the continent and countless hours of work.

Alfredo Sosa- Director of Photography & Multimedia

August 1, 2011
Monitor photographers have been visiting the continent of Africa for decades.  Next week the Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine will feature Africa and the myths that we hold about this very complex continent. 

I was very excited to revisit the work we have done in the last decade and give it a new outlet.  For better or for worse, many of these works are as relevant today as they were when we produced them.  One of the things that I do not like about photojournalism, is that our work seems so perishable.  We put our heart and soul into stories, work insane hours, just to see it pushed aside by the new story of the day.  In many ways, I wish to go back to the stories, when the world has moved on to the new “crisis du jour”, and take a deep look at people and the great stories that develop with time.  I think of places like Haiti, where the world focused so much right after the earthquake.   Now we all pretend/expect/wish that things are OK. But are we looking?

I hope you enjoy this preview of what’s to come next week.
Alfredo Sosa - Director of Photography & Multimedia

Monitor photographers have been visiting the continent of Africa for decades.  Next week the Christian Science Monitor weekly magazine will feature Africa and the myths that we hold about this very complex continent. 

I was very excited to revisit the work we have done in the last decade and give it a new outlet.  For better or for worse, many of these works are as relevant today as they were when we produced them.  One of the things that I do not like about photojournalism, is that our work seems so perishable.  We put our heart and soul into stories, work insane hours, just to see it pushed aside by the new story of the day.  In many ways, I wish to go back to the stories, when the world has moved on to the new “crisis du jour”, and take a deep look at people and the great stories that develop with time.  I think of places like Haiti, where the world focused so much right after the earthquake.   Now we all pretend/expect/wish that things are OK. But are we looking?

I hope you enjoy this preview of what’s to come next week.

Alfredo Sosa - Director of Photography & Multimedia

July 5, 2011
Traditionally dressed men walk during a rehearsal of the Independence Day ceremony in Juba July 5, 2011. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic 

What drew me in to the photo was the texture and color of their clothing. But the expression on their faces is what kept me looking. Their serene look struck me considering the challenges that await their new country of South Sudan. They look tired but thankful for that particular moment of quiet.
Joanne Ciccarello, assistant photo editor
check out the other Photos of the Day for July 5th.

Traditionally dressed men walk during a rehearsal of the Independence Day ceremony in Juba July 5, 2011. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic 

What drew me in to the photo was the texture and color of their clothing. But the expression on their faces is what kept me looking. Their serene look struck me considering the challenges that await their new country of South Sudan. They look tired but thankful for that particular moment of quiet.

Joanne Ciccarello, assistant photo editor

check out the other Photos of the Day for July 5th.

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